This website uses its own and third-party cookies. Some of these cookies are used to develop analytical statistics of visits to the webpage, others to manage advertising or even others are necessary for the correct management of the site. If you continue to browse or click in accept we consider you accept the conditions for their use. You can get more information, or learn how to change the settings in our cookies policy?
Versión Española Versión Mexicana Ibercampus English Version Version française Versione italiana

22/5/2018  
    Ibercampus  | Editorial Board | Who we are | Ideology | Contact | Advertising rates | Subscription | RSS RSS
Policies
Inclusion policies
R&D
Employment
Economics
Culture
Green strategies
Health
Society and consumer
Sports
Debates
Interviews
Education
Grants & internships
Training
Trends
Enterprises & CSR
 Enterprises & CSR
ACNUR
AEGON
AIR LIQUIDE
ALCATEL-LUCENT
ALLIANZ
ARCELORMITTAL
ASIFIN
ASSICURAZIONI GENERALI
AXA
BANCO SANTANDER
BASF
BAYER
BBVA
BNP PARIBAS
CARREFOUR
DAIMLER AG
DEUTSCHE BANK
DEUTSCHE BÖRSE
DEUTSCHE TELEKOM
E.ON
ENEL
ENI
FORTIS
FRANCE TÉLÉCOM
GROUPE DANONE
IBERDROLA
INDITEX
ING GROUP
INTESA SANPAOLO
L'ORÉAL
LVMH
MUNICH RE
NOKIA
PHILIPS
RENAULT
REPSOL YPF
RWE
SAINT GOBAIN
SANOFI-AVENTIS
SAP AG
SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC
SIEMENS AG
SOCIÉTÉ GÉNÉRALE
SUEZ
TELECOM ITALIA
TELEFÓNICA
TOTAL S.A.
UNICREDIT
UNILEVER
VINCI
VIVENDI
VOLKSWAGEN

HEALTH
University of Plymouth

Second hand plastic toys could pose a risk to children´s health, study suggests


The plastic used in many second hand toys could pose a risk to children´s health because it may not meet the most up to date international safety guidelines, according to new research published in Environmental Science and Technology.
Ibercampus 29/1/2018 Send to a friend
Comparte esta noticia en TwitterFacebookTwitterdel.icio.usYahooRSS

Scientists from the University of Plymouth analysed 200 used plastic toys which they found in homes, nurseries and charity shops across the South West of England.

These included cars, trains, construction products, figures and puzzles, with all of them being of a size that could be chewed by young children.

They discovered high concentrations of hazardous elements including antimony, barium, bromine, cadmium, chromium, lead and selenium - which are chronically toxic to children at low levels over an extended period of time - in many building blocks, figures and items of jewellery that were typically either yellow, red or black.

Further tests showed that under simulated stomach conditions (involving extraction in dilute hydrochloric acid) several toys released quantities of bromine, cadmium or lead that exceeded limits set by the European Council's Toy Safety Directive, with the release of cadmium exceeding its limit value by an order of magnitude in some cases.

The research was led by Dr Andrew Turner, Reader in Environmental Science, who used x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry to analyse the presence of elements within individual toys.

He has previously conducted research which showed that decorated drinking glasses can contain harmful levels of lead and cadmium, and that playground paints should be more closely monitored to reduce potential danger to public health.

"This is the first systematic investigation of hazardous elements in second-hand plastic toys in the UK," Dr Turner said. "Second hand toys are an attractive option to families because they can be inherited directly from friends or relatives or obtained cheaply and readily from charity stores, flea markets and the internet. But while the Toy Safety Directive applies to new products there is no regulation covering the recycling or re-sale of older toys.

"With the introduction and refinement of the Toy Safety Directive, the plastics industry has had to take steps to eliminate hazardous elements from new toys. However, consumers should be made more aware of the potential risks associated with small, mouthable and brightly coloured old plastic toys or components. Without that, the attractive cost, convenience and recyclability of previously used toys has the potential to create a legacy of chemical contamination for younger children."


Other issues Health
Are Breast Cancer Apps Reliable?
New studies show dark chocolate consumption reduces stress and inflammation
Wef
Can you really be obese yet healthy?
Simple urine test could help predict the risk of developing age-related disease and even death
Video games to improve mobility after a stroke
Why you feel hungrier after you lose weight
Sleeping for longer leads to a healthier diet
People who sleep less than 8 hours a night more likely to suffer from depression, anxiety
The evolution of the gene responsible for red meat to produce cancer has been revealed

Subscribe free to our newsletter
Vanity Fea
The Prehistoric Origin of Cinema
José Ángel García Landa
Financial inclusion
Financial Education For All!
Carlos Trias
Brusselian Lights
European elections (I): which words are more used in the European political manifestos?
Raúl Muriel Carrasco
Humor and Political Communication
Comisión de Arbitraje, Quejas y Deontología (Spain) (3) You can´t be too careful
Felicísimo Valbuena
Want your own blog? Want to be read by universities?
Find out here
Books
The People vs Tech "How the Internet Is Killing Democracy"
Will Big Business Destroy Our Planet?
Casey, Michael J.; Vigna, Paul: Cryptocurrency "The Future of Money?"
Eurydice brief: Citizenship Education at School in Europe – 2017
The Future of Work
Ten Great Ideas about Chance
Theses and dissertations
1 EU has more digital specialists than before but skills gaps remain
2 Commission Launches Online Citizens´ Consultation
3 Children understand plant-animal interdependence by the age of eight, study concludes
4 EU to increase spending and improve delivery of education in emergencies and protracted crises
5 Study links parental support and career success of children
6 Study explores link between curiosity and school achievement
7 New project to tackle youth unemployment in the south Mediterranean region
8 Charlemagne Youth Prize 2018 goes to Polish project on WW2 camp
9 New studies show dark chocolate consumption reduces stress and inflammation
10 150 youth organisation from across Europe meet to discuss issues that matter to youth
Legal Advise | Privacy Policy | Editorial Board | Who we are | Ideology | Contact | Advertising rates | RSS RSS