This website uses its own and third-party cookies. Some of these cookies are used to develop analytical statistics of visits to the webpage, others to manage advertising or even others are necessary for the correct management of the site. If you continue to browse or click in accept we consider you accept the conditions for their use. You can get more information, or learn how to change the settings in our cookies policy?
Versión Española Versión Mexicana Ibercampus English Version Version française Versione italiana

20/10/2017  
    Ibercampus  | Editorial Board | Who we are | Ideology | Contact | Advertising rates | Subscription | RSS RSS
Policies
Inclusion policies
R&D
Employment
Economics
Culture
Green strategies
Health
Society and consumer
Sports
Debates
Interviews
Education
Grants & internships
Training
Trends
Enterprises & CSR
 Enterprises & CSR
AEGON
AIR LIQUIDE
ALCATEL-LUCENT
ALLIANZ
ARCELORMITTAL
ASSICURAZIONI GENERALI
AXA
BANCO SANTANDER
BASF
BAYER
BBVA
BNP PARIBAS
CARREFOUR
DAIMLER AG
DEUTSCHE BANK
DEUTSCHE BRSE
DEUTSCHE TELEKOM
E.ON
ENEL
ENI
FORTIS
FRANCE TLCOM
GROUPE DANONE
IBERDROLA
INDITEX
ING GROUP
INTESA SANPAOLO
L'ORAL
LVMH
MUNICH RE
NOKIA
PHILIPS
RENAULT
REPSOL YPF
RWE
SAINT GOBAIN
SANOFI-AVENTIS
SAP AG
SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC
SIEMENS AG
SOCIT GNRALE
SUEZ
TELECOM ITALIA
TELEFNICA
TOTAL S.A.
UNICREDIT
UNILEVER
VINCI
VIVENDI
VOLKSWAGEN

HEALTH
PESA CNIC-Santander project

Spanish research confirms the importance of breakfast in the prevention of cardiovascular disease


Skipping breakfast or eating very little at the start of the day doubles the risk of atherosclerosis. This is the latest finding from the Progression and Early Detection of Atherosclerosis study (PESA), led by the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III (CNIC) in partnership with Banco Santander, and is published today in the Journal of American College of Cardiology (JACC).
Ibercampus 3/10/2017 Send to a friend
Comparte esta noticia en TwitterFacebookTwitterdel.icio.usYahooRSS
he report shows that people whose breakfast contains less than 5% of the recommended daily calorie intake (100 calories for a daily intake of 2000) have on average twice the number of atherosclerotic lesions as those who eat a high-energy breakfast. This increased risk, moreover, is independent of classical risk factors such as smoking, high cholesterol, and physical inactivity. The report not only confirms the importance of eating breakfast for cardiovascular health, but also suggests that skipping breakfast could indicate more generally unhealthy eating and lifestyle habits.

The PESA-CNIC-Santander study is a prospective cohort study of more than 4000 middle-aged office workers and is led by CNIC General Director Dr. Valentín Fuster. Study participants are monitored with the latest imaging technologies over a 6-year period with the aim of characterizing the prevalence and progression of latent, 'subclinical' atherosclerotic lesions.

These imaging findings are scrutinized for associations with molecular markers and environmental factors, including dietary habits, physical activity, biorhythms, psychosocial characteristics, and exposure to environmental pollutants.

Atherosclerotic plaques are fatty deposits in the walls of arteries that first appear at a young age, but in these early phases they produce no symptoms, thus giving rise to the term subclinical atherosclerosis.

The significant impact of breakfast on cardiovascular health is well known. What the latest PESA project has done is to evaluate the relationship between 3 distinct breakfast patterns and the presence of atherosclerotic plaques in asymptomatic individuals. The results suggest that skipping breakfast is an indicator of more generally unhealthy lifestyle habits, associated with a higher prevalence of generalized atherosclerosis.

Subclinical atherosclerosis

The new study set out to characterize the association between different breakfast patterns and cardiovascular risk factors, and specifically to determine if skipping breakfast was linked to the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis in a population with no history of cardiovascular disease. The imaging analysis determined the presence of plaques in distinct vascular territories: the carotid and femoral arteries, the aorta, and the coronary arteries.

In the study population, 20% of participants regularly ate a high-energy breakfast, providing >20% of the recommended calorie intake. The largest proportion, 70%, ate a low-energy breakfast (between 5% and 20% of daily calorie intake), and 3% either skipped breakfast or ate very little (<5% of daily calorie intake). Individuals in this last category spent less than 5 minutes on breakfast, consuming only coffee or fruit juice, or skipped breakfast entirely. The CNIC research team also found that this group tended to have more generally unhealthy eating habits and a higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors.

Using ultrasound technology, the research team observed 1.5 times more atherosclerotic plaques in the arteries of breakfast skippers than in the vessels of study participants eating an energy-rich breakfast. Moreover, for some vascular regions the number of plaques was as much as 2.5 times higher in participants who skipped breakfast or ate very little. Study first author and CNIC researcher Irina Uzhova explained that these differences are independent of the presence of cardiovascular risk factors and unhealthy lifestyle habits.

Some earlier population studies showed that a good breakfast is related to lower body weight, a generally more healthy diet, and a lower chance of increasing cardiovascular risk through high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, and diabetes. It is also well known that lifestyle changes can modulate factors linked to cardiovascular risk, including diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure, and dyslipidemia. Diet, in terms both of nutritional quality and acquired eating patterns, is therefore a major target in strategies to prevent cardiovascular disease.

Study author Dr. José Luis Peñalvo explained that this is the first study to provide direct evidence for an association between different breakfast patterns and the presence of atherosclerotic lesions detected by noninvasive vascular ultrasound imaging. Dr. José María Ordovás, also a study author and an expert in nutrigenomics, added that the analysis suggests that skipping breakfast could be a genuine risk marker in the initial stages of atherosclerotic disease, requiring further research into the underlying mechanism of action. This point was underlined by PESA scientific coordinator Dr. Antonio Fernández-Ortiz: "We need earlier and more precise risk markers for the early phases of atherosclerosis that will allow us to improve strategies to prevent myocardial infarction, stroke, and sudden death. These latest results make a definite contribution to achieving this goal."

Dr. Fuster, the principal investigator on the PESA study, considers that the support for PESA from the Santander group and the CNIC provides a model for other research and business organizations to follow, emphasizing that "the PESA study makes an incalculable contribution to scientific knowledge and public health."

Banco Santander Medical Services Director Dr. José María Mendiguren, also an author on the study, added that that the PESA definitively positions Grupo Santander at the forefront of corporate social responsibility due to its contribution to knowledge generation in the important field of cardiovascular health.
 

Other issues Health
World Mental Health
New brain visualisation of Alzheimers at different ages holds out hope for faster diagnosis
Smartphone apps are an effective treatment option for depression, study finds
Dancing can reverse the signs of aging in the brain
Measures redefine our age with life expectancy
Interbrain synchrony key factor in understanding language and interpersonal communication
University of Birmingham has launched a 2million global research project
Drinking coffee could lead to a longer life, scientist says
Ultimate tan without the cancer risk
Vegetarian diets almost twice as effective in reducing body weight, study finds

Subscribe free to our newsletter
Vanity Fea
Let them have it?
Jos ngel Garca Landa
Financial inclusion
Financial Education For All!
Carlos Trias
Brusselian Lights
European elections (I): which words are more used in the European political manifestos?
Ral Muriel Carrasco
Humor and Political Communication
Comisin de Arbitraje, Quejas y Deontologa (Spain) (3) You cant be too careful
Felicsimo Valbuena
Want your own blog? Want to be read by universities?
Find out here
Books
Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World (Adam Grant)
The Econocracy "On the Perils of Leaving Economics to the Experts"
The Sum of Small Things "A Theory of the Aspirational Class"
Signals "How Everyday Signs Can Help Us Navigate the Worlds Turbulent Economy "
Millionaire Teacher "The Nine Rules of Wealth You Should Have Learned in School"
​​​​​​​Alvin Roth: "Who Gets What ― and Why"
Theses and dissertations
1 South Summit 2017, the leading entrepreneur event launched in Madrid
2 Over 400 projects in #SciChallenge competition
3 381 new species discovered in the Amazon
4 Jorge Snchez: "Yes, our Tuenti family has reached one million"
5 Commission continues work on fair and predictable employment contracts
6 New brain visualisation of Alzheimers at different ages holds out hope for faster diagnosis
7 Let them have it?
8 Announcement of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics for their contributions ongravitational waves
9 9 October World Post Day
10 Googles unveils AI technology devises
Legal Advise | Privacy Policy | Editorial Board | Who we are | Ideology | Contact | Advertising rates | RSS RSS